Lectures


Unless otherwise noted, all lectures are free and open to the public, and are held at
The Arsenal, Central Park, Fifth Avenue at 64th Street, 3rd floor gallery.

This series has been made possible by the support of Claude and Lucienne Bloch and Patagonia

 

MYSTERIES OF MIGRATION

[b]Arctic Tern[/b][br]© Ekaterina Papchinskaya*Arctic Tern
© Ekaterina Papchinskaya*

By Giff Beaton
Tuesday, January 20, 2015, 6pm

Join professional birding guide, lecturer, and author Giff Beaton for an in-depth look at the amazing feats of endurance and navigation many bird species accomplish twice a year. With lavish images and maps, this talk will bring insight into a complex and fascinating subject and will leave attendees with an enhanced appreciation for the hazards migrating birds surmount, and the impressive physical abilities they display, each spring and fall. 

URBAN GREENING FOR URBAN BIRDS

[b]"Empire State Revisited"[/b][br]© Daniel M.*"Empire State Revisited"
© Daniel M.*

By Paige Warren
Tuesday, February 17, 2015, 6pm

What are the needs of an urban bird? What can be done to enhance the diversity of birds and other species living in the city? The highly managed nature of a city landscape provides biologists with some unique opportunities to understand both the role of humans in altering patterns of biological diversity and the role of behavior in limiting animal distributions. Paige Warren, research assistant professor of natural resources conservation at University of Massachusetts-Amherst, will speak about her research to understand processes generating and maintaining biological diversity in a world that is becoming increasingly dominated by humans.

ORIGINS: READING THE EARLIEST DESCRIPTIONS OF AMERICA'S BIRDS

Rick WrightRick Wright

By Rick Wright
Tuesday, March 31, 2015, 6pm

One of the marvels of the Internet is that every one of us now has access to the first descriptions of nearly all of the world's birds, material that lay hidden for years or for centuries in libraries scattered around the world. Join author, lecturer, and birding guide Rick Wright for an exploration of the surprising and amusing stories of discovery that those resources preserve.

IMAGINING NEW YORK CITY FOR BIRDS AND OTHER BEASTS: THE WELIKIA PROJECT

The Welikia Project © Markley Boyer/WCS/CORBISThe Welikia Project © Markley Boyer/WCS/CORBIS

By Eric Sanderson
Tuesday, April 21, 2015, 6pm

The Welikia Project, formally known as The Mannahatta Project, is an interactive map that adds a 400-year-old visual overlay of the former landscape ecology of New York City and surrounding boroughs. The name Welikia means “my good home” and was spoken by the Lenape people who used to inhabit the island. Join the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Senior Conservation Ecologist Eric Sanderson for a discussion of the project, which uses georeferenced historical data and field samples collected over several years to create a multi-layered map of the “Muir Web,” or ecological community, of a specific area. Eric's talk will focus on new Welikia data that sheds light on the historical ecology of Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens, Staten Island and the New York Seascape.

Our website is protected by DMC Firewall!