Archive for December 2016

Recapping the 117th Central Park Christmas Bird Count

Central Park Morning Fog, 12/18/16 © Meryl Greenblatt

Central Park Morning Fog, 12/18/16 © Meryl Greenblatt

The 2016 New Jersey Lower Hudson (NJLH) annual Christmas Bird Count took place on Sunday, December 18, and results are flying in! Although the morning’s forecast called for heavy rain, we only experienced a light drizzle and some morning fog before it settled into a nice, mild winter day. The NJLH Count Circle is centered right in the Hudson River and includes Manhattan, Bergen and Hudson counties in New Jersey, and parts of Queens.

 

 

Hairy Woodpecker at 2016 Central Park Christmas Bird Count © Elaine Silber

Hairy Woodpecker at 2016 Central Park Christmas Bird Count © Elaine Silber

New York City Audubon organized the 117th annual Count in Central Park along with our partners from NYC Parks, Urban Park Rangers, and Central Park Conservancy. Altogether, 6,342 birds of 59 species were counted throughout the Park by over 75 participants. Highlights (bolded below) were American wigeon and Iceland gull on the Reservoir, a common yellowthroat east of the Pond, a killdeer in the North Meadow (possibly a new bird for the count!), and a northern pintail on the Pond. Some misses were red-breasted nuthatch, cedar waxwing, and brown thrasher, though some excellent birders did report brown thrasher and red-breasted nuthatches during Count Week, which includes the three days prior and three days following the official Count. Also reported in Central Park during Count Week were snow goose (flying over), red-shouldered hawk, long-eared owl, black-throated blue warbler, hermit thrush, and green-winged teal.

 

 

Canada goose – 125
mute swan – 1
wood duck – 6
gadwall – 2
American wigeon – 1
American black duck – 4
mallard – 445
northern shoveler – 113
northern pintail – 1
bufflehead – 9
hooded merganser – 8
ruddy duck – 156
pied-billed grebe – 2
double-crested cormorant – 1
great blue heron – 1
sharp-shinned hawk – 2
Cooper’s hawk – 7
red-tailed hawk – 16
American kestrel – 1
peregrine falcon – 1
American coot – 10
killdeer – 1
ring-billed gull – 512
Iceland gull – 1
herring gull – 149
great black-backed gull – 54
rock pigeon – 406
mourning dove – 85
belted kingfisher – 1
red-bellied woodpecker – 44
yellow-bellied sapsucker – 20
downy woodpecker – 22
hairy woodpecker – 2
northern flicker – 4
blue jay – 204
American crow – 19
black-capped chickadee – 48
tufted titmouse – 236
white-breasted nuthatch – 78
brown creeper – 3
Carolina wren – 3
golden-crowned kinglet – 1
ruby-crowned kinglet – 2
American robin – 239
gray catbird – 1
northern mockingbird – 13
European starling – 544
common yellowthroat – 1
fox sparrow – 17
dark-eyed junco – 73
white-throated sparrow – 1301
song sparrow – 13
swamp sparrow – 2
eastern towhee – 1
northern cardinal – 87
common grackle – 119
house finch – 3
American goldfinch – 20
house sparrow – 1099

In addition to the Central Park Count, there were also Counts in New Jersey, Randall’s Island, Inwood Hill, Riverside Park, Harlem, Bryant Park, Madison Square Park, Stuyvesant Town, East River Park, lower Manhattan, and for the first time, a feeder in Sunnyside, Queens! There was also a Count that took place on Governors Island to see if any additional species could be added to the Island’s list.

 

 

So far we’ve heard word of Baltimore orioles in various locations, a Lincoln’s sparrow in Bryant Park, and several exciting finds in New Jersey like a glaucous gull, red-headed woodpecker, Lapland longspur, seaside sparrow, and many more. Unfortunately, it seems the western tanager of City Hall Park departed just before the start of Count Week (perhaps to Queens, where one was counted during their count!). Final results for the entire NJLH Count Circle will be available soon on our website.

 

 

A huge thank you to those who participated in any of the NYC Counts this year, especially those who led and organized counts throughout the City!

CBC 2016 Central Park Southeast Team © Lynn Hertzog

CBC 2016 Central Park Southeast Team © Lynn Hertzog

-Debra Kriensky, Conservation Biologist